Tinker Maker

My Dhungala wall hangings in The Design Files story on Pop&Scott’s beautiful Dream Weaver lights.

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Photo by Bobby Clark of Bobby and Tide

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nimbus

Soft and ethereal, this is Nimbus.

White glazed, dimpled stoneware beads on barely there eucalyptus dyed hand made silk cord.

In the shop now.

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papaver

It is finally Spring and I am patiently waiting for all the seed I sowed several weeks ago to pop their little heads out of the earth. Including hundreds of little pastel poppies which I am very excited about. Hence the name of this new piece.

Three of my stoneware beads in pastel shades on handmade silk cord dyed with pomegranate, turmeric, marigold, madder and gardenia.

Simple knot closure. This piece has a drop of approx 36cm.

In the shop now.

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silk15detail2sml

Silk dyed with fresh pomegranate with turmeric, marigold, madder and gardenia extract.

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dhungala

My Dhungala series of silk dyed with river red gum and argyle apple on stoneware and linen is now available at the Pop & Scott showroom in Northcote. There are three sizes suitable for wearing as neck pieces or to hang on your wall. Some have already sold but there are more coming!

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tink_nar_21tink_nar_22

Nar is the Turkish name for pomegranate. And fresh pomegranate is what I used to dye the silk for the hand woven strap on this piece. Pomegranate is still my favourite source of dye and fresh pomegranate is where it’s at. I wove the strap on my little table top rigid heddle loom, I love its naïve texture. Paired with my glazed stoneware beads strung on marigold dyed silk and hammered copper.

In the shop now.

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tink_river_1 tink_river_2

Dhungala is the Yorta Yorta name for the Murray River, where the River Red Gums grow. When I was young (and fit) I used to take part in the Murray River Marathon paddling a kayak 400km (in a relay team) down that mighty river and past so many of these majestic trees lining its banks. The silk for this piece was dyed using red gum sawdust that has resulted in the softest shades of cream, silver and charcoal. Paired with seven of my carved stoneware beads.

In the shop now.

 

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tink_nar_1 tink_nar_2

Nar is the Turkish name for pomegranate. And fresh pomegranate is what I used to dye the silk for the hand woven strap on this piece. Pomegranate is still my favourite source of dye and fresh pomegranate is where it’s at. I wove the strap on my little table top rigid heddle loom, I love its naïve texture. Paired with my glazed stoneware beads strung on marigold dyed silk and hammered copper.

In the shop now.

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tink_emerald_1 tink_emerald_2

We had to make the short drive to Emerald yesterday to pick up a guitar that was being repaired. It was a good excuse to have coffee and cake at The General Food Store and a mosey ’round the vintage and op shops, I found a beautiful tweed skirt.

I grew up not far away, there was nothing to do in Emerald in my youth, except get off Puffing Billy and go to the bakery, ha listen to me “back in MY day…”.
It’s not that I didn’t appreciate the beauty of the area that I was raised in as a child, if anything it inspired me more than anything ever has, but it was just home. Now as an adult my heart aches more than a little for those green rolling hills, our farm…

Anyway (now I’m getting all wistful, it’s the weather), what more appropriate name for this piece and its copper carbonate glazed beads than Emerald. The silk was dyed with bits and bobs from the garden, which bits and bobs exactly I can’t remember but they imparted pastel greys and the softest hints of blue, rather like the colours of the Winter sky today.

In the shop now.

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meadowsweetsmlbedstraw coreopsissml madder2 ausindigosml japindigosml maddersml  tansysml woadsml stjohnswortsml

(From top to bottom: Meadowsweet, Lady’s Bedstraw, Coreopsis, Madder, Australian Indigo, Madder Buds, Tansy, Woad, St Johns Wort)

Not a lot happens in my garden at this time of year, it is cold and quiet with many plants hibernating underground. Most of the action happens in Spring and then late Summer/early Autumn when I harvest.

I took some photos in the garden this morning though and happened to notice the first tiny flower bud on the Indigofera, a sign that the days are indeed lengthening and soon the garden will be awake again.

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